January 13, 2016
Aleksandar

RS President Milorad Dodik has said the Serb entity will hold a referendum on the work of the Court and the Prosecution of Bosnia-Herzegovina.

He told Belgrade-based broadcaster Pink that this topic had not been discussed during his most recent meeting with Serbian Prime Minister Aleksandar Vucic.

Dodik said that he on previous occasions spoke about the planned referendum with representatives of the authorities in Belgrade, “and received suggestions that it should not be held.”

“We have the best relations with Serbia, whose government, unlike in previous periods, is not saying we must do something, but is instead providing suggestions and their views and is saying we should do as we think is best,” Dodik said.

This particular suggestion from Belgrade, he admitted, “was one of the strongest he received” – describing at the same time “those coming from Europe” as a stereotype he will not accept.

“The referendum will be held. All procedural activities have been completed, we are choosing the best day, either in March or April,” Dodik said, and added that the Serb Republic (RS) has been “the target for a long time, with persistent attempts to undermine the authority of the people who run its institutions, and the institutions themselves” – all with the aim of destabilizing the RS and making Bosnia-Herzegovina a unitary state.

This, according to him, is best demonstrated by the decision of the Constitutional Court of Bosnia-Herzegovina to declare RS Day unconstitutional. “The dismantling of the RS had never been abandoned, it was only a question of when it will be on the agenda.”

He recalled that the Assembly of the RS has already said it would not implement the decision of the Constitutional Court, “because if the (RS Day) date is changed, the character of the RS would be changed as well.”

The opposition in the entity, according to its president, “is against the referendum on the Bosnian Court and Prosecution that have been set up through unconstitutional decisions of the high representative, as they succumbed to an atmosphere created by foreigners.”

Dodik also spoke about the threat of terrorism in Bosnia-Herzegovina to say it was “very real” in a country with a growing number of Wahhabis.

He presented data coming from “the intelligence community – and not just Bosnian data”- that said 3,400 inhabitants of Bosnia-Herzegovina are estimated to be capable of carrying out terrorist acts.

About 500 people, according to him, have already joined Islamic State, and some of them are now returning to Bosnia-Herzegovina.

Dodik pointed out that “many people have tried to hide the fact the killing of a policeman in Zvornik was a terrorist act.”

He also stated that since the 1990s war in Bosnia 1,100 mosques have been built, with their number in Sarajevo “dramatically increased.”

“In the new part of Sarajevo we have a mosque built by a prince from Saudi Arabia, where the Wahhabis gather,” Dodik said, adding:

“In Ilidza and in other parts of Sarajevo Saudi investors are building apartments for people from the Arab world, and if they come, that will change the character of Bosnia-Herzegovina.”

The RS leader pointed out that “many Wahhabis can already be seen in public services, and one can never be sure how they will act.”

According to Dodik, “these sleepers are the most dangerous story that exists in this region.”

Source: B92