April 26, 2016
Aleksandar

The Progressives (SNS) will still have a majority in Serbia’s National Assembly, but if it has no partners, the party will face a more numerous opposition.

This is according to the Republic Electoral Commission (RIK) election results data published on Monday morning, based on 97.45 percent of processed polling stations.

Beside the SNS, who achieved a convincing victory, taking just under 50 percent of the cast ballots, 11 more election lists will have seats in the new parliament – six that have crossed the five-percent threshold, and five more, representing ethnic minorities.

Only seven electoral lists had seats in the previous parliament elected in 2014 – two that were in power (pre-election coalitions gathered around the SNS, and the SPS), two in opposition (the DS and the SDS), and three minority.

According to the latest results on Monday, all these lists will have now fewer deputies.

The SNS should now have 131 deputies – 27 less than in 2014 – while the SPS-JS coalition will have 30 deputies – 14 less than in the assembly’s previous composition.

After four years, the Radicals (SRS) return to the assembly with 21 deputes.

They are followed by the DS (16 deputies – 3 less than in 2014), the newcomers Enough is Enough Movement DJB (16), the LDP-LSV-SDS (13 – 5 less than the SDS had in 2014) and the DSS-Dveri (13), who also return to the assembly.

Minority lists include the Alliance of Vojvodina Hungarians (4 deputies), Muamer Zukorlic’s BDZ (2), the SDA (2), the Party of Democratic Action (1) and the Green Party (1).

In Serbia, elections are held under a proportional representation system in a single, nationwide constituency, with closed party-list representation, and the 250 seats distributed in proportion to the number of votes received by each party-list.

Only electoral lists which have received more than five percent of the total number of votes cast in the elections take part in the distribution of the seats – this rule does not apply to electoral lists of political parties of national minorities, who can take part in the distribution of the seats regardless of the number of the votes they received (“natural threshold” principle).

Source: B92